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realsocialskills:

youneedacat:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

youneedacat said:
All that plus —
It diminishes the entire world to treat things like this as some kind of proprietary thing owned by people with certain disabilities that nobody else gets to do.  I’m getting really fucking sick of reading posts that treat assistive tech as something owned by disabled people that nobody else gets to use for any reason.  Nothing, nothing at all, nothing whatsoever, is served by that attitude, other than maybe people’s egos.  give it a rest.

realsocialskills said:
Agreed. I’m pretty sure that in this case the person who made that claim is actually a troll, but I’ve seen people say stuff like that and actually mean it.
I’ve been trying to write about that, but it’s very difficult to write clearly.

realsocialskills:

youneedacat:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

youneedacat said:

All that plus —

It diminishes the entire world to treat things like this as some kind of proprietary thing owned by people with certain disabilities that nobody else gets to do.  I’m getting really fucking sick of reading posts that treat assistive tech as something owned by disabled people that nobody else gets to use for any reason.  Nothing, nothing at all, nothing whatsoever, is served by that attitude, other than maybe people’s egos.  give it a rest.

realsocialskills said:

Agreed. I’m pretty sure that in this case the person who made that claim is actually a troll, but I’ve seen people say stuff like that and actually mean it.

I’ve been trying to write about that, but it’s very difficult to write clearly.

deafmusiq:

bookish:

R.I.P. Barbara Park, author of the beloved “Junie B. Jones” books. Park has passed away at 66 after a long battle with ovarian cancer. With irreverent, slangy titles such as “Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus” or “Junie B., First Grader: Cheater Pants,” the six-year-old’s adventures are instantly relatable to kids, and became classics for all of us who grew up with them.

Park lives on through the “Junie B. Jones” books—all of which you can buy here—and in the series’ interactive website.

……..holy hell

Well, I’d like to thank this lady for getting me into reading…even if she’s the same person that caused my aversion to “stewie, pewie tomatoes.”

Rest in Peace.

creatures-alive:

Blue-headed Agama, adult male (by Kenneth Tinnesen)

creatures-alive:

Blue-headed Agama, adult male (by Kenneth Tinnesen)

nevver:

San Francisco

(Source: upperplayground.com)

simplysweet07:

YOU CAME TO THE WRONG NEIGHBORHOOD….
THAT IS THE ANGRIEST ZEBRA I HAVE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE.

simplysweet07:

YOU CAME TO THE WRONG NEIGHBORHOOD….

THAT IS THE ANGRIEST ZEBRA I HAVE EVER SEEN IN MY LIFE.

(Source: headlikeanorange)

third-eyes:

staceythinx:

Science-inspired necklaces from the Delftia Etsy store

nimrodprower:

what

nimrodprower:

what

(Source: animrockzombie)

jennytrout:

starklyinaccurate:

trashfeels:

neurowonderful:

(Image description: A partial screenshot of a blog post. The title reads “How I reduced screaming and verbal stimming in my child with autism”, and below that is a colour photograph of a hand holding a rectangular plastic “clicker” device.)I think I may have mentioned this blog post, and the sadness and confusion I felt when I came across it, in one of my videos. This screenshot is from the blog of an “autism parent”. Yes, that is a clicker. Yes, she is encouraging the use of animal training methods on Autistic children. Yes, she considers any kind of vocal stimming, not just screaming, to be a “bad behaviour”. To top it all off, her blog banner reads, “Discovering SOLUTIONS to the Everyday Problems of Living with AUTISM”. Here is an excerpt from her tutorial on how to train your disabled child like a dog to have a “Quiet Mouth”:

Third, I sat back and watched my child. Since he was making bad noises, I decided to reinforce Quiet Mouth (i.e., lips together, no sound). Whenever he had a split second of Quiet Mouth, I immediately tagged (made a click-sound with the device) and handed over a treat. Every time his mouth was Quiet, I tagged (clicked) and treated. Soon there was much more Quiet Mouth behavior. When doing this it is important to ignore and pay no attention to vocal stims or screaming. Do not look at the child, do not speak to him/her or explain. Just say nothing, and immediately tag and treat as soon as there is even a split second of Quiet Mouth. You can also tag and treat a child for any appropriate vocalizations. If he/she says a nice word, or makes an appropriate comment, then tag and reinforce that. Your goal is to increase Quiet Mouth and appropriate vocalizations.

And sadly, as bad as this attitude and treatment of Autistic children is, this is a relatively tame example when compared to the other unethical treatments, therapies, and methods of discipline that Autistic children are being subjected to every day (all in the name of making them appear less obviously Autistic). This is why we need Autism Acceptance Month and not the fear-mongering, negative, misinformed “awareness” that Autism Speaks and its allies are pumping out this April.
We need acceptance because Autistic children should be loved and accepted wholly and completely for who they are, not hurt and mistreated in their parent’s frantic search for a “cure”. Because Autistic people deserve to be treated with respect and listened to, not silenced and forced or coerced to conform to an ableist, non-disabled ideal. Because Autistic children need accommodation and understanding to live healthy, happy lives, not sketchy “treatments” and intensive, soul-crushing “therapies” to try to make them appear more neurotypical and less Autistic.
For more information on ASAN’s Autism Acceptance Month, see the about page on the website here: http://www.autismacceptancemonth.com/about/

Oh my fucking god. Are you kidding me?! To your own KID? TO ANY KID? A FUCKING CHILD?!This is absolutely disgusting, is this really how people see autistic people? As, like, not people?!

As an autistic person, I’m not surprised by this AT ALL. When I was a kid, my professors dealt with my stimming by tying, then gluing my hands down so they couldn’t move and not allowing me to use my hands for eating (even fruit or boiled eggs!) 
We need to do something about these so-called “autism parents” and guarantee the safety and security of autistic children instead of throwing useless amount of money at an unnecessary “cure”

I can’t. I look at my son and I see the difficulties we have raising him, and never, in a thousand years, would I ever look at this child and think to myself, “We’ll try this thing that works on dogs.” Clicker training a child? Really? This is child abuse. This is just fucking torture. Don’t look at the kid or communicate? I’m shaking, I’m so angry and sad and horrified. These people need their children taken away from them. These kids need to be protected.

jennytrout:

starklyinaccurate:

trashfeels:

neurowonderful:

(Image description: A partial screenshot of a blog post. The title reads “How I reduced screaming and verbal stimming in my child with autism”, and below that is a colour photograph of a hand holding a rectangular plastic “clicker” device.)

I think I may have mentioned this blog post, and the sadness and confusion I felt when I came across it, in one of my videos. This screenshot is from the blog of an “autism parent”. Yes, that is a clicker. Yes, she is encouraging the use of animal training methods on Autistic children. Yes, she considers any kind of vocal stimming, not just screaming, to be a “bad behaviour”. To top it all off, her blog banner reads, “Discovering SOLUTIONS to the Everyday Problems of Living with AUTISM”. Here is an excerpt from her tutorial on how to train your disabled child like a dog to have a “Quiet Mouth”:

Third, I sat back and watched my child. Since he was making bad noises, I decided to reinforce Quiet Mouth (i.e., lips together, no sound). Whenever he had a split second of Quiet Mouth, I immediately tagged (made a click-sound with the device) and handed over a treat. Every time his mouth was Quiet, I tagged (clicked) and treated. Soon there was much more Quiet Mouth behavior. When doing this it is important to ignore and pay no attention to vocal stims or screaming. Do not look at the child, do not speak to him/her or explain. Just say nothing, and immediately tag and treat as soon as there is even a split second of Quiet Mouth. You can also tag and treat a child for any appropriate vocalizations. If he/she says a nice word, or makes an appropriate comment, then tag and reinforce that. Your goal is to increase Quiet Mouth and appropriate vocalizations.

And sadly, as bad as this attitude and treatment of Autistic children is, this is a relatively tame example when compared to the other unethical treatments, therapies, and methods of discipline that Autistic children are being subjected to every day (all in the name of making them appear less obviously Autistic). This is why we need Autism Acceptance Month and not the fear-mongering, negative, misinformed “awareness” that Autism Speaks and its allies are pumping out this April.

We need acceptance because Autistic children should be loved and accepted wholly and completely for who they are, not hurt and mistreated in their parent’s frantic search for a “cure”. Because Autistic people deserve to be treated with respect and listened to, not silenced and forced or coerced to conform to an ableist, non-disabled ideal. Because Autistic children need accommodation and understanding to live healthy, happy lives, not sketchy “treatments” and intensive, soul-crushing “therapies” to try to make them appear more neurotypical and less Autistic.

For more information on ASAN’s Autism Acceptance Month, see the about page on the website here: http://www.autismacceptancemonth.com/about/

Oh my fucking god. Are you kidding me?! To your own KID? TO ANY KID? A FUCKING CHILD?!This is absolutely disgusting, is this really how people see autistic people? As, like, not people?!

As an autistic person, I’m not surprised by this AT ALL. When I was a kid, my professors dealt with my stimming by tying, then gluing my hands down so they couldn’t move and not allowing me to use my hands for eating (even fruit or boiled eggs!) 

We need to do something about these so-called “autism parents” and guarantee the safety and security of autistic children instead of throwing useless amount of money at an unnecessary “cure”

I can’t. I look at my son and I see the difficulties we have raising him, and never, in a thousand years, would I ever look at this child and think to myself, “We’ll try this thing that works on dogs.” Clicker training a child? Really? This is child abuse. This is just fucking torture. Don’t look at the kid or communicate? I’m shaking, I’m so angry and sad and horrified. These people need their children taken away from them. These kids need to be protected.

padnote:

everyone today

image